Should the use of Nuclear Weapons be banned?

did you
know...
The lethal area for an above-ground blast for a Mt explosion is about 150 square km; the associated fire conflagration would be lethal over 350 square km.

Make Nuclear Weapons the target

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JOIN THE SOCIAL EXPLOSION WITH FACEBOOK AND TWITTER
EXPLORE THE DEVASTATING IMPACT OF A NUCLEAR BLAST ON YOUR WORLD

We'll make your vote count

Riding on the early success of the campaign, Red Cross and Red Crescent representatives made your voice heard at an international conference in Geneva. An historic resolution was passed, calling for a ban on the use of nuclear weapons.

We will continue to use your votes to show the groundswell of public concern about the horrific effects of nuclear weapons.

Put your marker on the map and help Australian Red Cross
build support for a ban on the use of nuclear weapons.

Thanks for putting yourself on the map, now see what it would really be like if a nuclear weapon was used where you live. Use the controls below to simulate a nuclear blast.

WIND DIRECTION: E
N NE E SE S SW W NW
ZONE
PHYSICAL EFFECTS
1st Degreee Burns
Sunburn-like discomfort, skin redness
2nd Degree Burns
Blisters and pain, like burns by boiling water
3rd Degree Burns
Skin charring and necrosis, requiring medical care
Conflagration
Most people will die within 24 hours
who's involved

We're making it happen

Check out who's joined the social explosion to make nuclear weapons the target. Join now

learn more
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The disruption to the global climate could see a drop in food production which could leave one billion people at risk of starvation.
Nuclear weapons do not discriminate. The initial flash incinerates people at close range. Injuries include severe burns, lung trauma, damage to internal organs, and blindness.
All the dedicated burns beds in the world would not be enough to care for the surviving burns victims of a single Hiroshima size bomb on a city.
Women are overall 40 percent more susceptible to radiation-induced cancer than men, and foetuses and infants are three to four times more susceptible than adults.
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Hiroshima,
1945

Tens of thousands were instantly killed when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Five years later nearly 500,000 people had died from the effects of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs.

Even today, survivors still struggle with increased rates of cancer and chronic disease.

Junko Morimoto was a happy 13-year-old living in Hiroshima when the nuclear bomb was dropped on her city in 1945. Junko told Australian Red Cross her moving story of surviving the blast and rebuilding her life, having lost everything.

“Surrounded by screams, it was as if I was in hell. I was in shock with scenes around me. The whole area was destroyed. I was horrified. I felt nothing but fear at the time.”

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nuclear tests
in australia

Australia has not been immune to the effects of nuclear weapons - in October 1953, Totem 1 was tested in Emu Junction in the South Australian desert.

Yami Lester was a ten-year-old boy living in his homeland and was permanently blinded by the blast. The radiation that blew over him and his community caused death and destruction.

'A few hours after the black smoke came we all got crook, every one of us. None of us could hunt, so we couldn't have our traditional bush tucker. We were all vomiting, we had diarrhea, skin rashes, and sore eyes. Some of the older people, they died. They were too weak to survive all of the sickness.

'War makes me scared. War is scary. But war with nuclear bombs would be even scarier – just thinking about it makes me shiver. No one would be safe in nuclear war. Those nuclear bombs are no good, we gotta make sure nobody uses them.'

Currently there is no specific law or treaty in place to ban the use of nuclear weapons. Australian Red Cross is calling on the international community to support a convention to ban the use of nuclear weapons.

Our mandate

The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is the world's largest humanitarian organisation.

We have a specific mandate to educate the public and work with governments on the laws of war.

We'll take your vote to the international stage

Following the early success of the campaign, where you helped establish an historic resolution calling for a ban on the use of nuclear weapons, we will continue to make your voice heard on the international stage. Together we will work towards a legally-binding international agreement to ensure nuclear weapons are never used again, and are ultimately eliminated.

Thousands of people are supporting our campaign
and making nuclear weapons the target.

Meet just some of these people and learn why they voted YES to ban the use of nuclear weapons.

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Reg Mombassa

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Ruby Rose

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Mike Goldman

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Marion Grasby