FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Make Nuclear Weapons the Target campaign

What Is the Next Step of the Make Nuclear Weapons the Target Campaign?

'Make Nuclear Weapons the Target' is an advocacy campaign to raise awareness about nuclear weapons and their terrible humanitarian and environmental costs.
Following stage one of the campaign, Australian Red Cross took your views on nuclear weapons to an international Red Cross meeting in Geneva, and returned with a resolution called 'Working towards the elimination of nuclear weapons'.
The historic resolution of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement appeals to States to ensure nuclear weapons are never again used, and to create laws to prohibit their use.
There is still much to be done, and we want your help.
We are calling on people to show how much they care by sharing a photo or short video (less than 20 seconds) of a precious place, person, object or moment that encapsulates the one thing they'd miss most if their world was destroyed tomorrow by a nuclear bomb.
Your collective voices will help us continue to advocate with governments and the international community for a ban on the use of nuclear weapons.

Why Is Australian Red Cross Running a Campaign About Nuclear Weapons Now?

Red Cross always works to limit suffering during war. Today, nine countries across the world have more than 17,000 nuclear weapons in total. The public awareness of nuclear weapons has lessened, but the threat is just as real.
Shockingly, the potential power of these weapons equals approximately 150,000 Hiroshima bombs. But unlike cluster bombs and landmines, there is no specific law making the use of nuclear weapons clearly illegal.
Australian Red Cross is reigniting the debate about nuclear weapons and working to educate a whole new generation of people about this crucial issue. We are specifically targeting the use of nuclear weapons: this campaign does not comment on nuclear energy.

What Sort of Damage Do Nuclear Weapons Cause?

Nuclear weapons kill, maim and destroy lives and our environment. They are capable of destroying the planet in a matter of hours. Think of it this way: a single nuclear bomb, if dropped on Sydney or Melbourne, could kill millions of people.
The initial flash from a nuclear weapon vaporises or incinerates those at close range; further away they cause blindness and burns to exposed skin.
High doses of radiation can cause acute injury and death; lower doses can cause an increase in chronic disease; all doses increase the long-term risk of cancer and genetic damage.
In 1945, tens of thousands of people were instantly killed when the first nuclear bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan. Five years later nearly 500,000 people had died from the effects of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs. Even today, survivors still struggle with increased rates of cancer and chronic disease.
Australian Red Cross wants to make sure that the terrible suffering experienced by nuclear weapons never happens again, and we need your help!

How Can I Get Involved?

Share

Share a photo or short video (less than 30 seconds) of a precious place, person, object or moment that encapsulates the one thing you'd miss most if your world was destroyed tomorrow by a nuclear bomb. Visit nextstep.targetnuclearweapons.org.au to share what you love most about the world.

Vote!

You can make nuclear weapons the target by voting on our primary campaign micro-site (website), targetnuclearweapons.org.au.

The micro-site has lots of interactive, informative content and features and offers people the opportunity to be part of the next 'social explosion'.

Visit targetnuclearweapons.org.au to find out more.

What Happens With the Results?

We will collect the videos and photos of the things you love and make one amazing video calling for an international treaty to ban the use of nuclear weapons.

We will use this message and the information we gather from your vote to talk to governments and people in positions of influence, and let them know how much you care about this important issue.

We are calling on the international community to support a ban on the use of nuclear weapons.

What Sort of Activities Is Red Cross Doing During the Campaign?

Australian Red Cross is:
  • calling on you to share a photo or short video (less than 20 seconds) of a precious place, person, object or moment that encapsulates the one thing you'd miss most if your world was destroyed tomorrow by a nuclear bomb at nextstep.targetnuclearweapons.org.au.
  • showing a video highlighting all the things campaign supporters love at an international Red Cross Red Crescent conference in Sydney this year.
  • encouraging people to vote on our targetnuclearweapons.org.au micro-site and the Red Cross website – www.redcross.org.au, and answer the question, 'Should the use of nuclear weapons be banned?'
  • running public information and awareness raising events nation-wide
  • using email and social media to engage people on this important issue, including Facebook and Twitter

What Were Some of the Results from the First Stage of the Campaign?

Following the first stage of the 'Make Nuclear Weapons the Target' advocacy campaign, Australian Red Cross took the community's views to an international Red Cross meeting in Geneva in November 2011 which resulted in an historic resolution called 'Working towards the elimination of nuclear weapons'.
In March 2013, Australian Red Cross' CEO addressed the first ever government conference on the humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons in Norway. Government representatives from 127 countries attended the Oslo conference. A further global meeting of governments will be convened in Mexico in 2014.
In April 2013, the South African Government delivered a statement on behalf of 74 nations at the most recent Non-Proliferation Treaty conference focusing exclusively on the humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons. The statement is very much in line with Red Cross Red Crescent's position and makes specific reference to the 2011 resolution.
In May 2013, the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement met in Hiroshima to progress the issue further within the Movement.
A follow up resolution is currently being discussed within the Movement, and it will be tabled when the Movement meets in Sydney in November 2013.